Tag Archives: Bradley P. Beaulieu

Author Interview: Bradley P. Beaulieu

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Today I am interviewing Bradley P. Beaulieu, author of the new epic fantasy novel, A Veil of Spears, the latest installment in the The Song of the Shattered Sands series.

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DJ: Hi Bradley! Thanks for agreeing to do this interview!

For readers who aren’t familiar with you, could you tell us a little about yourself?

Bradley P. Beaulieu: Hello, and thanks for having me by for a chat!

I’m a software engineer by training, and until recently worked in that field full time since graduating from the Milwaukee School of Engineering. I got the itch to start writing somewhere along the way, though it wasn’t something I took seriously until I looked at a novel project that was about six years old and still unfinished. I figured it was time to either finish it or give up on writing.

Since then I’ve published over two dozen short stories and seven novels, with five more novels under contract. I largely write epic fantasy, but like to dabble in science fiction in short form. For five years I also ran Speculate! The Podcast for Writers, Readers, and Fans, with Greg Wilson, a project I was and still am proud of but that I eventually had to step away from due to time constraints. But the old episodes are still live, and people should definitely check out the new ones as well.

DJ: What is The Song of the Shattered Sands series about?

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Bradley: The series follows the exploits of Çeda, a young woman whose mother was mysteriously killed by the twelve kings who rule the desert city of Sharakhai with a collective, iron fist. What began as a quest for revenge turns into a journey of discovery for Çeda when she comes across one of the miserable asirim, creatures who steal into the city to take tributes each night of the twin full moons. Çeda is not killed as she feared, and uncovers a wondrous secret. Her mother left clues to her heritage and the history behind the kings’ power in a book of poems she left for Çeda when she died. As Çeda begins to unlock the secrets of the kings’ past, she discovers more about her mother, their people, and the dark bargain the kings made with the gods of the desert to secure their power.

The Song of the Shattered Sands is epic fantasy told largely through the lens of our hero, Çeda. In fact, when I began writing it, I wanted to tell it only through Çeda’s point of view. I ended up expanding the POV characters, but this is still first and foremost Çeda’s tale. It’s also a tale of how culture and customs can be lost, how the victors write the history books, and how those written out of it struggle to uncover the truth and right the wrongs committed along the way. Continue reading

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Author Interview: Bradley P. Beaulieu and Rob Ziegler

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Sci-Fi November is a month-long blog event hosted by Rinn Reads and Over The Effing Rainbow. It was created to celebrate everything amazing about science fiction. From TV shows to movies, books to comics, and everything else in between, it was intended to help us share our love and passion for this genre and its many, many fandoms.


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Rob Ziegler

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Bradley P. Beaulieu

Today I am interviewing Bradley P. Beaulieu and Rob Ziegler, authors of the new science-fiction novella, The Burning Light.

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DJ: Hey Bradley and Rob! Thanks for agreeing to do this interview!

For readers who aren’t familiar with you, could you tell us a little about yourself?

Bradley P. Beaulieu: Sure thing. I’m the epic fantasy author of Twelve Kings in Sharakhai and The Winds of Khalakovo. That may seem a bit odd, as what we have in The Burning Light is most decidedly not epic fantasy, but I’ve been known to dabble in science fiction now and again. It’s all been short fiction so far, this new project with Rob being the longest foray into sci-fi for me to date.

My tastes in terms of writing and reading are pretty similar. I tend to like longer tales with a wide cast of characters. I like worlds that are both broad and deep. And I like the spec-fictional elements to have bearing not just on the world, but to have real meaning and consequences to the people who use it, often to the point that those elements are world changing to some degree. Some of my main influences are J.R.R. Tolkien, George R.R. Martin, C. S. Friedman, Robin Hobb, Tad Williams, and Stephen R. Donaldson.

Rob Ziegler: I’m the author of the novel Seed. It’s the story of a young scavenger cum highwayman trying to save his younger brother from a giant agri-corp in a southwest ravaged by climate change. It has the feel of a western by way of The Road Warrior.

I write full time. Currently I’m working on my second novel, Angel City, as well as the occasional side project like The Burning Light. Over the years I’ve basically done everything—landscape design, IT, bartending, real estate management. My wife and I live a mostly chill life in western Colorado. We hike a lot.

DJ: What is The Burning Light about?

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Bradley/Rob: The Burning Light is a sci-fi thriller set in a world which has just begun to recover from climate-change. The emerging order is based on connectivity. People are connected–very connected, organized into collectives. Through the flooded canals of Old New York, it follows a young addict named Zola as she chases the Burning Light, a “communal drug” so addictive it can lay entire collectives to waste. But Zola is being chased as well, by a disgraced government operative named Colonel Melody Chu.

The story follows Zola as she tries to find the truth about the light, while Colonel Chu tries to find Zola and stop her before the Light causes even more devastation. What they find together is something neither of them expected.

DJ: What were some of your influences for The Burning Light?

Continue reading

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