Tag Archives: City of shards

Author Interview: Steve Rogers

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Today I am interviewing Steve Rogers, author of the new epic fantasy novel, City of Shards, first book in the Spellgiver series.

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DJ: Hi Steve! Thanks for agreeing to do this interview!

For readers who aren’t familiar with you, could you tell us a little about yourself?

Steve: Thanks for the opportunity!

I have been writing most of my adult life in various capacities, but “City of Shards” and “In the Claws of the Indigen” (books 1 and 2 of Spellgiver) are my debut novels. They have been seen by an army of beta readers, as I always wanted to make them shine before I released them into the wild. I stopped work on the novels for some time in order to write short stories, and many of those have been published in on-line magazines and anthologies (my last submitted short story “Canvas Tears” will be published in May in Heroic Fantasy Quarterly).

Last year, after permanently leaving the short story world, hiring another round of beta readers and a professional cover artist/editor, I finished both books—“City of Shards” and “In the Claws of the Indigen”. The first is on pre-order at Amazon, and the second will be available for pre-order in early April.

DJ: What is City of Shards about?

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Steve: At the center of the story is Larin, a boy from a violent neighborhood who suffers horrible outbursts that cause him to shout meaningless words at random. These uncontrollable spasms have turned him into a pariah in the gang-ridden Wormpile district, where his only protection comes from his drug-addicted uncle, a man with a mysterious past who’s better with a sword than most people are with a fork.

Larin eventually learns that his outbursts have marked him as servant to an ancient evil, one that is in permanent war with the Six-Legged Gods. So, when clergy of the Six-Legged Gods erect their temple in a neighboring district, things go from bad to worse. Those priests busy themselves with good deeds and cry for social justice, gaining the people’s trust while rousing them against the throne. But Larin suspects that those fiery speeches mask a hidden agenda, and he soon finds one dismaying fact: As bad as Larin’s Master is, Larin will either follow that monstrosity or watch the city slide into an even darker abyss. Continue reading

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