Author Interview: Errick Nunnally

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Today I am interviewing Errick Nunnally, two-time Hugo Finalist with Journey Planet and author of the new horror short-story, Devil’s Hollow, which can be read in the new anthology, Giving the Devil His Due.

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DJ: Hi Errick! Thanks for stopping by to do this interview! 

For readers who aren’t familiar with you, could you tell us a little about yourself?

Errick Nunnaly: Hi, DJ! Thanks for the opportunity. I am a relatively normal human with a weakness for comic books, sci-fi, and other speculative works. I was raised in Boston, Massachusetts—the Mattapan neighborhood—and after high school I did a stint in the U.S. Marine Corps. I have a Fine Arts degree in Graphic Design—a very dissonantly titled degree—and a black belt in Krav Maga/Muay Thai. Like most authors, I have a wide range of interests from socio-political history to marine biology to cocktails.

DJ: Before we get to your story, as I mentioned above, Giving the Devil His Due, is a charity anthology. What charity is the anthology for, and why was this project something you wanted to be a part of?

GTDHD - Special Edition Cover Errick: The anthology is for The Pixel Project, a non-profit focused on ending violence against women. They are an online collective, so their communications channels and network are huge in social media and new technologies. In particular, their project, the Read For Pixels Campaign, contains the anthology and related events such as blog tours, panels, signings, and interviews. I wanted to be a part of it because it’s currently the best way for me to contribute to the cause.

DJ: What is your story, Devil’s Hollow, about?

Errick: The theme for the entire anthology was “comeuppance” with a Twilight Zone feel. I am a huge fan of revenge. I love comeuppance, it’s definitely an entertaining thought as it pertains to real world problems, if impractical all too often. So, these stories are supposed to reflect that. My story is about a woman who comes to recognize the opportunity that follows when she and her toxic husband drop their son off at college. Through a serendipitous occurrence, she comes in contact with a network that’s all to happy to encourage her…independent thinking.

DJ: What were some of the inspirations behind Devil’s Hollow

Errick: The different forms of abusive behaviors that partners can model. I wanted to present a situation that was not as overt as someone who is unfamiliar with domestic violence might think. How someone can be trapped and to what extent their autonomy erased. And I really, really, really wanted to present a comeuppance that was unexpected and plausible.

DJ: There are many different definitions of horror in genre, so I’m curious, when you write “horror”, how is it that you try to scare your readers? Do you go for gore? Shock? Maybe build up tense moments? Perhaps it is the unknown? Does a horror story even need to try to scare its reader?

Errick: I don’t believe horror needs to be scary, shocking, or gory, per se as much much as it needs to be disturbingly horrific. It should also plumb as much human depth and emotion as possible. It is horrific by demonstration, not necessarily that the characters are experiencing the emotion of horror as much as they are in a horrific situation. If their solution to the probem is as disturbingly horrific as the problem, we’re good. That said, everyone has their threshold and there are plenty of different writers out there willing to go mining for it.

DJ: Being an author, what do you believe makes a good short-story? How does it differ from writing novel-length stories?

Errick: Short stories get to the point much faster. It’s more difficult to create the sort of believable tension that a novel can wallow in, but I think that often makes short horror more entertaining.

DJ: The anthology has already been published for a couple months now; what have you noticed that readers have been talking about most with your story once they finish it?

Errick: I’m actually surprised I haven’t heard more about Karla’s solution at the end of the story. I put a lot into figuring that out and making it as plausible as possible! I’m not sure even a fictional detective could put it together. There’s also a name, a historical reference to an infamous, largely unknown woman who knew how to deal with problematic men in the 17th century. I sincerely hope someone finds that stuff as interesting as I do!

DJ: When I read, I love to collect quotes – whether it be because they’re funny, foodie, or have a personal meaning to me. Do you have any favorite quotes from Devil’s Hollow that you can share with us?

Errick: “It felt as if the ground would split at any moment and she’d slide down into Hell where the Devil himself would welcome her.”

DJ: Where can readers find out more about you? 

Amazon Author Page: amazon.com/author/erricknunnally

Blog: erricknunnally.us

Linkedin: linkedin.com/in/erricknunnally/

Twitter: @erricknunnally

Website: erricknunnally.us

DJ: Before we go, what is that one thing you’d like readers to know about Devil’s Hollow and Giving the Devil His Due that we haven’t talked about yet?

Errick: One of the reasons I wrote this story the way I did was as a challenge. Often, I’m working in the speculative realm, but for this I tell as realistic a tale as possible.

DJ: Thank you so much for taking time out of your day to answer my questions!

Errick: The pleasure was all mine, thank you!

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***Giving the Devil His Due is published by Running Wild Press and is available TODAY!!!***

100% of the net proceeds from the sales of the anthology will go towards supporting The Pixel Project’s anti-violence against women work!

Buy the Book: 

Amazon | Goodreads | The Pixel Project

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About the Book:

Giving The Devil His Due showcases stories where The Twilight Zone meets Promising Young Woman as men who abuse and murder women meet their comeuppance in uncanny ways. Edited by Rebecca Brewer, the anthology features sixteen major names and rising stars in Fantasy, Science Fiction, and Horror including Angela Yuriko Smith, Christina Henry, Dana Cameron, Errick Nunnally, Hillary Monahan, Jason Sanford, Kaaron Warren, Kelley Armstrong, Kenesha Williams, Leanna Renee Hieber, Lee Murray, Linda D. Addison, Nicholas Kaufmann, Nisi Shawl, Peter Tieryas, and Stephen Graham Jones

The book includes resources for victims and survivors of VAW worldwide, making it a valuable tool for getting life-saving information to domestic violence victims still under their abuser’s control or rape survivors who are too ashamed to ask for help.

100% of the net proceeds from the sales of the anthology will go towards supporting The Pixel Project’s anti-violence against women work.

You can learn more about Giving The Devil His Due here.


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 About the Author:

Errick Nunnally was born and raised in Boston, Massachusetts, he served one tour in the Marine Corps before deciding art school would be a safer—and more natural—pursuit. He is permanently distracted by art, comics, science fiction, history, and horror. Trained as a graphic designer, he has earned a black belt in Krav Maga/Muay Thai kickboxing after dark. Errick’s work includes: the novels, BLOOD FOR THE SUN and LIGHTNING WEARS A RED CAPE; LOST IN TRANSITION, a comic strip collection; and first prize in one hamburger contest. The following are some short stories and their respective magazines or anthologies: PENNY INCOMPATIBLE (Lamplight, v.6, #3 and the Podcast NIGHTLIGHT); JACK JOHNSON AND THE HEAVYWEIGHT TITLE OF THE GALAXY (The Final Summons); WELCOME TO THE D.I.V. (Wicked Witches); A FEW EXTRA POUNDS (Transcendent); and A HUNDRED PEARLS (PROTECTORS 2: stories to benefit PROTECT.ORG). Eventually, Errick came to his senses and moved to Rhode Island with his two lovely children and one beautiful wife.

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One thought on “Author Interview: Errick Nunnally

  1. […] Tour Stop #3: The MyBooksMyLifeMyEscape Blog Interview (7 April […]

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